WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS


AS PUBLISHED IN "THE PEOPLES' POST" NEWSPAPER DURING 2009

Weddings and Photography! - tip number 1.

This is a big question! Best left to a reputable professional photographer, the most important aspect is the professional relationship and understanding between the couple and their photographer.

Pre-wedding meetings are essential and I like to suggest an informal “engagement” shoot at a relaxed venue at least a week before the wedding.

Brides are advised to check the what exactly is included in their wedding shoot packages. It's a case of horses for courses. However, it is best to ensure that your precious Rands are spent on a solid reliable photographer with decent equipment first, before the gimmicks.

A number of suppliers these days rely heavily on fixing errors and adding special effects afterwards using the computer – so called “photoshopping”. This can lead to long delays, sometimes up to 4 weeks or longer, in finished work being delivered to the happy couple.

Best clear this upfront before paying your deposit.

More Weddings and Photography! Tip Number 2

What to do if we can't afford a big wedding shoot? The cheapest approach is an all-digital shoot, preferably professional. Prints and enlargements can always be done later, but it is important that the actual photography is as professional as possible.

If you simply have to use a favourite aunt or uncle to take pics, here are some tips:

  • Make sure that they shoot from the best possible position and that they shoot at the highest possible digital resolution their camera can do.
  • If they are using film, ask them to use quality film and even a roll of black and white film for closeups of the couple.
  • Rather shoot off too many photos than too few.
  • Watch the lighting situation and remember to use flash!
  • Ask the person with the camera to break away with bride and groom for some personal pics right after the ceremony. Avoid crowds.
  • Be aware of the background in the photo. Ask the photographer to take a few shallow depth of field shots (more later).
  • Finally, have a backup person with a second camera.




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